Posts tagged: Quotes

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , February 17, 2012 4:31 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

     Jewish religious philosopher Abraham Heschel, in his meditations on the sabbath: ‘The meaning of the Sabbath is to celebrate time rather than space. Six days a week we live under the tyranny of things of space; on the sabbath we try to become attuned to holiness in time.’ Whereas we move about in space in order to win space through the use of technology, and in order to deal with the ‘thing- ness’ of space, the goal in the realm of time is not to have but to be. The religions of ‘the nations’ concentrate on sacred places and sites. But ‘Judaism is a religion of time aiming at the sanctification of time’. The sanctification of time is not a disparagement of space. Both the conquest of space and the sanctification of time are part of the task assigned to human beings. But the sanctification of time has to be a commandment of its own, since it does not impose itself of itself, like the conquest of space. It is the necessary counter-weight to the life that usurps space, because it calls a halt to the threatening enslavement of the human being to technological civilization. So on the sabbath the tools which can so easily be beaten into weapons are laid aside, money dealings are avoided, and in the midst of the struggle for existence which seems so omnipresent, we can find an island of peace in which to live [emphasis mine].

- Prof. Bernd Wannenwetsch, University of Aberdeen
Political Worship : Ethics for Christian Citizens, p. 349

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , February 10, 2012 12:38 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

The time is right to learn about rest from the long Jewish Sabbath tradition. The need is great. The frantic pace, the exhaustion that accompanies it and the resulting emptiness call us back to a rhythm that includes stopping and resting. We are drawn to the words of Jesus about abundant life and his peace that passes understanding, but often we don’t know how to access them. The sabbath is a concrete way to start, a practical and ancient solution to an enduring human need.

Lynne M. Baab, Sabbath Keeping, p. 51-52

Monday Meditation

By , February 6, 2012 9:34 am

A meditation to begin the week:

Our Beloved Friend
Outside the Domination System
May your Holy Name be honored
By the way we live our lives.

Your Beloved Community comes.
Guide us to:
Walk your Walk
Talk your Talk
Sit your Silence
Inside the courtroom, on the streets, in the jailhouses
As they are on the margins of resistance.

Give us this day everything we need.
Forgive us our wrongs
As we forgive those who have wronged us.
Do not bring us to hard testing,
But keep us safe from the Evil One.

For thine is:
The Beloved Community,
the power and
the glory
forever and ever. Amen.

- Open Door Community Jesus Prayer

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , February 3, 2012 5:00 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

Sabbath-keeping practiced can unhook us from appetite-driven and production-driven machine of our culture. It helps us discover the liberty of saying no in order to say yes. Identification with God’s rest on a weekly basis can foster some of the spiritual and emotional resources we need to see and feel beyond ourselves. What a priority-calibrating gift it is to take a full day every week to rest and realign your life with the passions of God! No to busyness. No to unnecessary consumption. No to 24-7 productivity. No to media. Yes to God. Yes to worship. Yes to community. Yes to justice.

- Mark Labberton, The Dangerous Act of Worship:
Living God’s Call to Justice, p. 171

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , January 27, 2012 2:55 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

     If we ask what the sabbath is there for, we are asking about two different things. It is one thing to ask about its function, and another to ask what is meant by its ‘blessing’. (It is only in this sense that we can ask about a commandment.) What does it mean for us when God ‘blessed’ the seventh day? In the way the story of creation is told, it may first of all strike us that the human being celebrates the first sabbath before he himself has performed any work. So he shares God’s rest, not like God, by ‘celebrating from his (own human) works’, but by celebrating with God ‘from his (divine) works’. For the human being himself has as yet no works which he could contemplate. This relativity and relatedness remain the secret of the sabbath even after the human being has gone to work himself. The sabbath does not acquire its meaning from the act of working. It does not just belong to the people who have work. It belongs to all human beings. On the sabbath, human beings do not look at their own work, at least not primarily. Every sabbath is supposed to be like the human being’s first sabbath, when he had as yet no work of his own at which he could have looked back. The rest which is meant for human beings is to be found in the contemplation of God’s works, from which they live. If a person looks at these, his gaze becomes free. It is neither drawn downwards, because it is fixed on the part-work of his own hands, nor upwards at the success of his work, which elevates him above other people. It is not the fragments of what he does that he sees, and not the question of how he could perfect them; what he has before him are the perfect works of God.

- Prof. Bernd Wannenwetsch, University of Aberdeen
Political Worship : Ethics for Christian Citizens, p. 347

 

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , January 20, 2012 5:00 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

     And what we are thankful for provides us with a subversive imagination. While the cybernetic revolution will tell us that the world is in the hands of those with the powerful computers and widest Net access, and while the forces of globalization arrogantly proclaim that those who control capital have a proprietary right to the resources of creation, we confess that this world is the inheritance of those who live in the light—not the din light of the Enlightenment, not the glittering lights of computer screens , televisions and gambling terminals, but the light that liberates us from the darkness. You see, friends, because we are not subservient to the empire but subjects of the kingdom of God’s beloved Son, we have the audacity to say to the darkness, “We beg to differ!” We will not be a pawn to the Prince of Darkness any longer, because we owe him no allegiance, and by God’s grace through our redemption and forgiveness, our imaginations have been set free.

- From a targum for Colossians 1:1-14
Brian J. Walsh and Sylvia C. Keesmaat
Colossians Remixed: Subverting the Empire, p. 40-41

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , December 30, 2011 2:00 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

Frederick Buechner, in his recent book Longing for Home, writes: “We carry inside us a vision of wholeness that we sense is our true home that beckons us.” But, he adds, “woe to us if we forget the homeless ones who have no vote, no power, nobody to lobby for them, who might as well have no faces. Woe to us if we forget our own homelessness. To be homeless the way people like you and me are apt to be homeless is to have homes all over the place but not really to be home in any of them. To be really at home is to be really at peace, and our lives are so intrinsically interwoven that there can be no peace for any of us until there is real peace for all of us.”

- Walter Brueggemann, Conversations Among Exiles


Sabbath in the Burbs

By , December 23, 2011 5:00 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

In contrast to the arrogance, lack of relationships, and abstraction embodied in the global meltdown, we find material concreteness, relationship, and humility affirmed in the Christmas story. The story celebrates a person with a face who entered into time; it celebrates a relational, family community; and it celebrates a humble baby Jesus. Christmas is the church’s re-enacting this major chapter of the fullness of the Christian story: the story that the Word of God became flesh in the womb of a Virgin only to suffer and die an unjust death, before being raised to new life and ascending to heaven. This true story schools us in concreteness: we recall the baby in the manger in Bethlehem. It schools us in community and relationships: Jesus was born of a woman, born into an extended family, born into a neighborhood, born into a village, and born into friendships. And it schools us in humility: the birth of our Lord was a modest birth, in the humble circumstances of a migrant family. Hence, the story of Christ’s birth offers contrasting ways of imagining globalization that can lead to constructive improvisation and concrete action that is re-framed by the Christmas story. Re-enacting the Christmas drama helps us re-imagine alternative practices to the current system of global money and global capital circulation.

- From The Fullness of Time in a Flat World by Scott Waalkes, p. 69-70

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , December 16, 2011 5:00 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

Christmas is the promise that the God who came in history and comes daily in mystery will one day come in glory. God is saying in Jesus that in the end everything will be all right. Nothing can harm you permanently, no suffering is irrevocable, no loss is lasting, no defeat is more than transitory, no disappointment is conclusive. Jesus did not deny the reality of suffering, discouragement, disappointment, frustration, and death; he simply stated that the Kingdom of God would conquer all of these horrors, that the Father’s love is so prodigal that no evil could possibly resist it.

-  From Reflections for Ragamuffins by Brennan Manning
Used in A Guide for Prayer for All Who Seek God, p. 27

Sabbath in the Burbs

By , June 24, 2011 5:00 pm

A quote to begin the Sabbath:

In this light the Sabbath prescription is a loving reminder to take full advantage of a condition that already exists. At rest, our souls are restored. This is the only commandment that begins with the word “remember,” as if it refers to something we already know, but have forgotten. It is good. It is whole. It is beautiful. In our hurry and worry and acquiring and working, we forget. Rest, take delight in the goodness of creation, and remember how good it is.

- Wayne Muller, Sabbath, p. 44

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